KwaAfrica was established in 1995 to enable people living with HIV/AIDS to lead healthy, fulfilling and long lives.

In early 1990s London a group of professionals from the African diaspora grew increasingly concerned about the impact of HIV/AIDS on their community. The epidemic had claimed many lives, torn apart families and left children without parents, yet the root causes were not being adequately addressed. Recognising that such a complex issue would require concerted engagement, a decision was made to create an organisation that could make a difference by bringing together community resources.

1990s:

  • Advocating for the needs of users and access to services e.g. treatment, housing, immigration and benefits) signposting/referrals to THT, the Light house, Positive Women, UK Coalition of PLWHA;
  • Discussion with the Department of Health on ‘Mother to Child Transmission’ and involvement in policy development on testing pregnant women;
  • Reduction of mother to child transmission and uptake of ARV’s Training on HIV drug therapy and related health issues with clinicians, health professionals and users (Outreach training);
  • Shift from support to treatment as a result of treatment-related costs;
  • Regular conference-attendance and presentations on treatment updates and adherence;
  • Building a sexual and reproductive health clinic in partnership with Mifumi, Eastern Uganda with funds from the National Lottery;

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Early 2000s:

  • Shift in focus to building international partnerships with KWA and CHAWOA;
  • International work with partners replicating work in the ‘UK’ through North-South Shared learning;
  • PSMP roll out through Stanford University training the official license holders;
  • Continued with sexual health prevention and work with faith communities;
  • Gradual shift in thinking from service provision towards sustainable approaches;

Late 2000s:

  • Education and training, building awareness; lobbying Ugandan government to roll out PSMP (ministerial support initially);
  • Developing linkages with national and international NGOs – CR PLP, OD/Capacity strengthened; tapped into mentoring and coaching;
  • Education of OVC’s, especially girls, to increase enrolment and retention in school, Eastern Uganda;

2010s:

  • Adopted a rights based approach to enhance sustainability and to link project support directly to national and international conventions and frameworks;
  • Changed name from Africare to KwaAfrica;
  • New relationship with UK Department for International Development aimed at increasing the attendance and attainment of girls in primary school;
  • Expansion into five London boroughs, continuation of HIV support and increase in prevention projects, involving engagement of hard to reach populations and provision of point of care testing;